Church Works
Dunmow Flitch Jugs

The design almost certainly relates to the award of the Dunmow Flitch. The story became popular after the publication of a book on the subject in the year previous to the publication date of the jug: W. Harrison Ainsworth, The Flitch of Bacon or the Custom of Dunmow (1854). The lead horseman appears to be carrying the flitch, and a second flitch forms the thumb rest on the handle, there being carried on the head of the fellow in the handle in the manner of a Smithfield meat porter.

 

E. J. Ridgway & Abington

Dunmow Flitch ~ Off-white

 

Dunmow Flitch ~ Off-white

The jug is 202mm tall.

Dunmow Flitch 12 jug off-white top

Dunmow Flitch 12 jug off-white right side

Dunmow Flitch 12 jug off-white lip side

Dunmow Flitch 12 jug off-white left side

Dunmow Flitch 12 jug off-white handle side

Dunmow Flitch 12 jug off-white base

Dunmow Flitch 12 jug off-white marks

Despite being partially obscured by glaze, the cartouche reads:
"Published by / E. RIDGWAY & ABINGTON, / HANLEY / January 1, 1855."
The impressed "12" is the size of the jug, and refers to the number in a potters' dozen.
The other mark is probably a moulder's tally mark.

The jug is 162mm tall.

Dunmow Flitch 30 jug off-white top

Dunmow Flitch 30 jug off-white right side

Dunmow Flitch 30 jug off-white lip side

Dunmow Flitch 30 jug off-white left side

Dunmow Flitch 30 jug off-white handle side

Dunmow Flitch 30 jug off-white base

Dunmow Flitch 30 jug off-white marks

The cartouche reads:
"Published by / E. RIDGWAY & ABINGTON, / HANLEY / January 1, 1855."
The impressed "30" is the size of the jug, and refers to the number in a potters' dozen.
The other mark is probably a moulder's tally mark.

Photos © Angela Grant 2018

 

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